//IndieCade East: Sessions and Speakers

2012 Festival Panels and Workshops
IndieCade Sessions and Screenings: take a break from the games to gain insight and knowledge from their creators.
Find information about all IndieCade East sessions, talks, panels, and speakers below, and check out the full schedule here.

//FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 4:00 - 8:00 PM


//Sportsfriends & Friends

4:00 - 8:00 PM
There’s something special about playing games with friends. From chess to basketball, games have traditionally been played by people sharing the same space, but modern digital games tend to focus on individual play or network play from afar. Sportsfriends is a group of game designers who have banded together to bring back local multiplayer with a compendium of four highly acclaimed games. We’ve invited these talented indies, along with Henry Smith, creator of iOS party game sensation Spaceteam, to talk about the magic of digital games that friends play together.


//Play Sportsfriends !

4:00 - 7:00 PM
From 4 pm - 7 pm Friday, play all the Sportsfriends games: Johann Sebastian Joust (IndieCade 2011 winner in both the Technology and Impact categories), Hokra (IndieCade 2012 Audience Choice winner), BaraBariBall (IndieCade 2012 Official Selection), and Pole Riders. Plus, bring your iOS device and turn strangers into friends while yelling at them with Spaceteam! TOGGLE THE GYROGIZMO!!! (don’t worry, you’ll get it when you play it...)


//Sportsfriends Panel

7:00 - 8:00 PM
A special panel discussion by Sportsfriends game creators.

Doug Wilson, Ramiro Corbetta, Noah Sasso, and Henry Smith, Moderated by Frank Lantz
Frank Lantz is the Director of the NYU Game Center. For over 12 years, Frank has taught game design at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program. He has also taught at the School of Visual Arts, and Parsons School of Design. His writings on games, technology and culture have appeared in a variety of publications. In 2005 Frank co-founded Area/Code, a game design studio that created cross-media, location-based, and social network games. He has worked in the field of game development for the past 20 years. Before starting Area/Code, Frank worked on a wide variety of games as the Director of Game Design at Gamelab, Lead Game Designer at Pop & Co, and Creative Director at R/GA Interactive.

Douglas Wilson is a Lead Game Designer and Partner at Die Gute Fabrik, a small games studio based in Copenhagen and New York City. Doug recently finished a PhD dissertation at IT University of Copenhagen, where he wrote about designing games that embrace an aesthetic of confrontation, silliness, and brokenness. His games have been shown around the world, in venues such as the Independent Games Festival, IndieCade, and the Museum of Modern Art.

Henry Smith likes pushing buttons. He has pushed buttons for Irrational Games in Boston, and BioWare/EA in Edmonton and Montreal, on games such as Dragon Age: Origins, Dead Space 2, and Mass Effect 3. His specialty is UI programming, but he also loves to dabble in art, design, systems & story. He is now totally independent and making his own games! His latest project is Spaceteam, with more to come...

Ramiro Corbetta is a New York-based independent game developer. His game Hokra, an IndieCade 2012 winner, has been displayed at over a dozen art spaces and festivals in North America and Europe. He also designed Glow Artisan, winner of the 2010 Independent Games Festival award for best mobile game design.

Noah Sasso spent the mid 00s managing and recording music for the record label/collective Kracfive, as well as paying dues while working for clients like Major League Gaming and Zeitgeist Films. After several years developing game prototypes, freelancing and working as a game designer at NYC's This is Pop, he was awarded a commission to produce an original game for the NYU Game Center's No Quarter exhibition. The result was BaraBariBall, a crowd favorite that has since appeared at festivals and tournaments around the world. His work has also appeared at EVO, the Star Pine Cafe and the Tokyo Game Show in Japan, Indiecade, New York's Knitting Factory, Vice Magazine, Pitchfork, the Los Angeles Times, XLR8R and many more.


//Exhibition!

4:00 - 8:00 PM, Exhibition continues Saturday and Sunday
Play IndieCade's Official Selections!! Hands on gameplay opens at 4:00 for IndieCade's official selections, with developers on hand with their games. In all there will be more than 20 nominated and award winning games, as well as a chance to get your hands on cutting edge new platforms Sifteo and Oculus VR.


//Spacewar Decathlon

4:00 - 8:00 PM, Decathlon continues Saturday and Sunday
Ready to show off your old school skillz? Are you better at space-fragging than the rest? Take part in the Spacewar! Decathlon to show your stuff. Ten arcade games from the exhibition, Spacewar!: Video Games Blast Off will be the field of contest over the course of IndieCade East. Remember: wear your sweatbands, maintain your focus and stay alive. Games include Asteroids (Atari, 1979), Battlezone (Atari, 1980), Computer Space (Nutting Associates, 1971) , Defender (Williams, 1980) , Galaxy Force II (Sega, 1988), Missile Command (Atari, 1980), Space Invaders (Taito, 1978), Space Wars (Cinematronic, 1977), Star Wars (Atari, 1983), Tempest (Atari, 1981), and the championship Spacewar!


//Show and Tell Sign Up

4:00 - 8:00 PM, Show and Tell is Saturday and Sunday
Want to show your game at IndieCade East? Sign up to be part of Show and Tell showcase! You'll get a time slot to share your game with the IndieCade East audience, hear player feedback, pitch your game, and do a quick presentation during the IndieCade East Game Slam! So swing by the sign up desk from 4-8pm on Friday (first come, first serve, spaces are limited) for a chance to game to the world!

All attendees with a full conference pass can sign up during our open sign up session (first come, first serve) for a time slot in our Show and Tell Lounge. Game Makers will be able to show their game at IndieCade East during that time slot and present it during our Ouya hosted Game Slam. Come early, sign up and you're in!




//SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 11:30 AM - 10:00 PM


//Show and Tell Lounge

Show and Tell Lounge is open all day and continues Sunday
Come check out what the newest games from the IndieCade community. Game makers will be sharing their games to the general public and they'll be there to talk to you about what inspires them, how they made their game, and listen to your feedback!


//Exhibition!

Exhibition is open all day and continues Sunday
Play IndieCade's Official Selections!! Hands on gameplay with IndieCade's official selections (all day) and meet the game creators who will be on hand with their games. In all there will be more than 20 nominated and award winning games, as well as a chance to get your hands on cutting edge new platforms Sifteo and Oculus VR.


//Spacewar Decathlon

Decathlon runs all day and concludes on Sunday
Ready to show off your old school skillz? Are you better at space-fragging than the rest? Take part in the Spacewar! Decathlon to show your stuff. Ten arcade games from the exhibition, Spacewar!: Video Games Blast Off will be the field of contest over the course of IndieCade East. Remember: wear your sweatbands, maintain your focus and stay alive. Games include Asteroids (Atari, 1979), Battlezone (Atari, 1980), Computer Space (Nutting Associates, 1971) , Defender (Williams, 1980) , Galaxy Force II (Sega, 1988), Missile Command (Atari, 1980), Space Invaders (Taito, 1978), Space Wars (Cinematronic, 1977), Star Wars (Atari, 1983), Tempest (Atari, 1981), and the championship Spacewar!


//"Let's Play" Indie Games Screening

Ongoing Screening
"Let's Play" Independent Games: Let's Play videos emerged in 2007 as a popular way of sharing gameplay experiences online. Let's Play creators record videos of themselves completing games while narrating the process. For IndieCade East, Mike Sawyer--arguably the inventor of the Let's Play video--will organize a selection of videos chosen by members of the Something Awful Let's Play forum.


//PlayStation Mobile Game Jam

GameJam runs all day and concludes Sunday
This is an invitation-only GameJam for participants to create a game and an opportunity for IndieCade East attendees to view the process of live game creation. Though the game developers themselves have been previously assigned to the teams, all IndieCade East pass holders will have the chance to view the jammers as they work on PlayStation Mobile game development from the Digital Learning Suite as well as attend the Live GameJam Feedback Session on Saturday, the 16th and the Game Jam Screenings from 7 - 7:50 pm on Sunday the 17th.


//Games as Commentary

12:00 - 1:00 PM
Games are built from mechanics and aesthetics for many reasons, by many different people, for many different reasons and ideas. The unique interplay between the game state, its aesthetics, and its mechanical rules allow developers who wish to craft pointed commentary and meditations on the ideas behind these games. A conversation between independent gamemakers Paolo Pedercini, Richard Hofmeier, and Ian Bogost discuss crafting games for the purpose of commentary, documentary, and the communication of ideas.

Paolo Pedercini, Richard Hofmeier, Heather Chaplin, and Ian Bogost, Moderated by Simon Ferrari.


Dr. Ian Bogost is a scholar, author, and game designer. He is Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies and Professor of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Founding Partner at Persuasive Games LLC. As an author, he writes about videogames as a medium with many uses. As a game designer, he makes games for political, social, educational, and artistic uses. Bogost is author or co-author of seven books: Unit Operations,Persuasive Games, Racing the Beam, Newsgames, How To Do Things with Videogames, Alien Phenomenology, and the forthcoming 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10. Bogost's videogames cover topics as varied as airport security, disaffected workers, the petroleum industry, suburban errands, and tort reform. His games have been played by millions of people and exhibited internationally. His game A Slow Year, a collection of game poems for Atari, won the Vanguard and Virtuoso awards at the 2010 Indiecade Festival.

Simon Ferrari is a PhD student in the Digital Media department at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He worked on the Knight Foundation-funded ""Games and Journalism"" research project for four years, which culminated in the publication of Newsgames: Journalism at Play (MIT Press, 2010) and the beta release of Game-o-matic, a tool for generating and customizing journalistic videogames. Simon is a freelance game critic with publications at Paste magazine, Kill Screen, and PBS IdeaLab. He is currently teaching in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication while writing a dissertation on the philosophy of electronic sport."

Paolo Pedercini is an Italian game developer, artist and educator. He teaches digital media production and experimental game design at the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University. Since 2003 he works under the project name “Molleindustria” producing provocative games addressing issues of social and environmental justice (McDonald's videogame, Oiligarchy, Phone Story), religion (Faith Fighter) and labor and alienation (Every Day the Same Dream, Unmanned).

Richard Hofmeier is a Seattle artist. His retail simulation Cart Life is a 2012 Indiecade nominee and currently nominated for three awards in the 2013 Independent Games Festival, including the Seamus McNally Grand Prize.

Heather Chaplin is a Brooklyn-based journalist. Currently, she’s an assistant professor at The New School, where she is developing a cross-divisional journalism program. Previously, she covered videogames for All Things Considered, a topic about which she’s also written for The New York Times, The LA Times, GQ, Details, and Slate. She’s the co-author of the 2006 New York Times-notable book Smartbomb about the games industry, and has been interviewed and cited on the subject in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, and The Believer among other places. Currently, Chaplin is working on a Knight Foundation grant developing digital models of complex systems in the news.


//Game Slam

1:00 - 2:00 PM
It's like a poetry slam, only with games. See the games showing in IndieCade's festival long Show-And-Tell! Or bring your game and get ready to unveil it to a group of eager game devs and game lovers. Hear the mastermind ideas behind developer's work, their process of development and plans. Keep your spiels short and snappy and make sure to sign up early - there's many eager to show and tell. Sign ups will go through the IndieCade Show and Tell. The Game Slam is an informal affair and a good time for anyone who's made a game, wants to make a game or appreciates that people make awesome games. Come out and see for yourself. GameSlam is hosted by Ouya. Sign up for the GameSlam starts Friday at 4:00 in the Fox Amphitheater

Moderated by Bob Mills
Bob Mills is OUYA's game guy. He plays games and talks with developers about creating and adapting titles for OUYA.


//Why We Make Games Panel

2:00 - 3:00 PM
Vlambeer's Rami Ismail has been making videogames since he was six years old, before he started making them professionally two and a half years ago. A talk about the history of videogames, the reach of the medium, the powers of interactivity and some games that frankly, you shouldn't be missing and why not.

Presented by Rami Ismail
Rami Ismail is the business & development guy at Vlambeer, the award-winning Dutch independent studio best known for Super Crate Box, GUN GODZ, Ridiculous Fishing, LUFTRAUSERS, Yeti Hunter and many more games. Rami also created presskit(), a tool that allows indie developers around the world to reach out to press and market their games. Rami exclusively drinks cane sugar coke.


//Well Played, Session 1 (Thirty Flights on Loving)

3:00 - 3:30 PM
What makes a game good? or bad? or better? Building on the ETC Press books and journal and the success of last year's sessions, Drew Davidson will play and speak about Thirty Flights of Loving, created by Brendon Chung. Thirty Flights of Loving is a game that approaches interactive storytelling from a radical departure point - though moments and style may seem familiar, the economy of storytelling and unique interactions set Thirty Flights of Loving apart. Built from short vignettes that tease the story out while the player explores a contained but rich and unique world, Thirty Flights of Loving is a compelling narrative you won’t soon forget. Well Played Sessions hosted by Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center.

Presented by Drew Davidson
Drew Davidson is a professor, producer and player of interactive media. His background spans academic, industry and professional worlds and he is interested in stories across texts, comics, games and other media. He is the Director of ETC-Pittsburgh, and the Acting Director of the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University and the Founding Editor of ETC Press and its Well Played series and journal.


//Well Played, Session 2 (Hokra)

3:30 - 4:00 PM
Margaret Robertson and Kevin Cancienne find out if they have what it takes to challenge some of the world's best players in Ramiro Corbetta's Hokra. In an interview with Corbetta, Robertson and Cancienne will discuss the process of getting good at a particular game, the importance of doing so, and the challenges and benefits of gaming with a spouse. Hokra is a minimalist digital sports game. A fast-paced, competitive game for two teams, Hokra uses sports metaphors to foster cooperation between teammates and competition between opponents. The game has simple controls and minimal rules while not losing the depth that makes multiplayer games exciting for advanced players. Like the sports from which it draws inspiration, Hokra is engaging to both player and spectators. Hokra’s music and sound design were created by Nathan Tompkins.

Presented by Margaret Robertson and Kevin Cancienne
Margaret Robertson is a game designer and consultant who has worked on award-winning games for the commercial, cultural and educational sectors. Her previous role as an independent consultant enabled her to sectors. Her previous role as an independent consultant enabled her to work on a huge range of projects, from AAA console titles, through download and mobile/handheld games, to indie and art-house projects. She's worked with brands, broadcasters, and film studios to develop their game strategies, and was part of the team that built the Channel 4‘s multi-BAFTA-award winning game slate. Previously editor-in-chief of Edge magazine, and part of the team behind the GameCity festival ,she is an internationally top-rated speaker on game design theory.

Kevin Cancienne is an independent game developer based in New York who has been creating interactive media and games for over 15 years. In 1999, Kevin co-developed Science and Industry, a multiplayer mod for Half-Life which was featured in Valve´s first Mod Expo. As a freelance game developer, Kevin designed and built games for HBO and Nickelodeon. For nearly 5 years, Kevin served as Senior VP and Director of Game Development at Area/Code, where he collaborated on games such as Drop 7, Parking Wars, and Shark Runners. Before going indie, Kevin spent a year as Executive Producer at Zynga New York. He has been a columnist for hookshotinc.com, has taught game development at NYU, and has a continuing interest in altering how, when, and with whom we play.


//GameJam Live Feedback and Playtesting

4:00 - 5:30 PM
Join our game jammers as they put the finishing touches on their Playstation Mobile games live at Indiecade! In this workshop session, audience members get to offer crucial feedback, witness the game development process in real-time, and playtest groundbreaking games in their final hours of development.


//Iron Game Design Challenge (Parsons v. NYU)

5:00 - 6:00 PM
Ohio State vs. Michigan. North Carolina vs. Duke. Harvard v. Yale. IndieCade East introduces the next great university rivalry, NYU Game Center vs. Parsons The New School for Design. These two New York Universities will compete on the most sacred of battlefields: Game Design! Whose design will reign supreme? Join team captains Eric Zimmerman (NYU) and Colleen Macklin (Parsons) as they lead teams of student designers in the challenge of real-time game design. Teams will be given a theme, materials, and a secret ingredient, and then will have to design a real-world game. As they wrack their brains for the right recipe, commentators Sam Roberts (IndieCade Game U Chair, USC) and Simon Ferrari (Georgia Institute of Technology) will give play-by-play and color commentary on this epic battle!

Presented by Eric Zimmerman and Colleen Macklin
Eric Zimmerman is a noteworthy author, designer, and professor, and draws upon the influence of Bernie DeKoven in his widespread books Rules of Play and The Game Design Reader. He is also a collaborator on museum installation games with architect Nathalie Pozzi. A member of the game design collective Local No. 12, Zimmerman contributions to game design and theory are found in his professorship at NYU's Game Center, his hand in founding the Institute of Play, and his creation of games such as the popular Metagame.

Colleen Macklin is a game designer, an Associate Professor in the school of Art, Media and Technology at Parsons The New School for Design and Director of PETLab (Prototyping Education and Technology Lab), a lab focused on developing games for experimental learning and social engagement. PETLab projects include curricula in game design for the Boys and Girls Club and via the website activategames.org, a set of disaster preparedness games with the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, and big games such as Re:Activism and the "fiscal" sport Budgetball. She is a member of the game design collective Local No. 12, best known for their collectible card game, the Metagame and The Leisure Society, a group exploring games and experimental narrative. Her work has been shown at Come Out and Play, UCLA Art|Sci Center, The Whitney Museum for American Art and Creative Time. BFA, Media Arts Pratt Institute, graduate studies in Computer Science, CUNY and International Affairs, The New School.


//Kris Piotrowski Keynote: The Dark Days: A Harrowing Journey Through CAPY's Secret Gameography

6:00 - 7:00 PM
Most people know CAPY from such games as Critter Crunch, Clash of Heroes, Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP and most recently, Super Time Force. However, things weren't always so dang exciting at the fine little independent studio... CAPY started out in the pre-iOS mobile space (better known as game-making hell), and spent its first five years making a veritable bucket-load of mobile games just to keep the lights on. This keynote will dissect, for the first time, CAPY's forgotten gameography, and outline how and why the studio transitioned, out of necessity, to independence.

Presented by Kris Piotrowski
Kris Piotrowski is the co-founder and creative director of CAPY, an award-winning game studio from Toronto, Canada. He is one of the co-creators of SWORD & SWORCERY EP, which received over 40 awards, including IndieCade 2011 - Best Visuals, Time Magazine Top Ten of Everything 2011, Game Developer Choice Award - Best Handheld / Mobile Game 2011, IGF Achievement in Art, New York Videogame Critics Circle - Best Mobile Game and IndieCade - Best Visuals. His other notable credits include lead designer of Clash of Heroes and Critter Crunch, two highly-acclaimed and award-winning games. He is currently working as creative director on a handful of new projects, including Super Time Force.


//Night Games

7:00 - 10:00 PM
Some games shine the brightest at night! NIGHT GAMES is an unforgettable Saturday evening of after dark gameplay. This special event for IndieCade East, gets players congregate after sunset, gathering together to explore games ranging from collaborative to competitive, sublime to athletic; from meditative to explosive; from solo to multiplayer; from digital to physical. In addition to these special Night Games only selections, players will be able to play all of the IndieCade East selection games.


//SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 11:30 AM - 7:00 PM


//Show and Tell Lounge

Show and tell is open all day
Come check out what the newest games from the IndieCade community. Game makers will be sharing their games to the general public and they'll be there to talk to you about what inspires them, how they made their game, and listen to your feedback!


//Exhibition!

Exhibition is open all day
Play IndieCade's Official Selections!! Hands on gameplay with IndieCade's official selections (all day) and meet the game creators who will be on hand with their games. In all there will be more than 20 nominated and award winning games, as well as a chance to get your hands on cutting edge new platforms Sifteo and Oculus VR.


//Spacewar Decathlon

Decathlon runs all day and concludes at 2:30 pm
Ready to show off your old school skillz? Are you better at space-fragging than the rest? Take part in the Spacewar! Decathlon to show your stuff. Ten arcade games from the exhibition, Spacewar!: Video Games Blast Off will be the field of contest over the course of IndieCade East. Remember: wear your sweatbands, maintain your focus and stay alive. Games include Asteroids (Atari, 1979), Battlezone (Atari, 1980), Computer Space (Nutting Associates, 1971) , Defender (Williams, 1980) , Galaxy Force II (Sega, 1988), Missile Command (Atari, 1980), Space Invaders (Taito, 1978), Space Wars (Cinematronic, 1977), Star Wars (Atari, 1983), Tempest (Atari, 1981), and the championship Spacewar!


//"Let's Play" Indie Games Screening

Ongoing Screenings
"Let's Play" Independent Games: Let's Play videos emerged in 2007 as a popular way of sharing gameplay experiences online. Let's Play creators record videos of themselves completing games while narrating the process. For IndieCade East, Mike Sawyer--arguably the inventor of the Let's Play video--will organize a selection of videos chosen by members of the Something Awful Let's Play forum.




//PlayStation Mobile Game Jam

GameJam runs all day and concludes with a screening at 7:00 PM
This is an invitation-only GameJam for participants to create a game and an opportunity for IndieCade East attendees to view the process of live game creation. Though the game developers themselves have been previously assigned to the teams, all IndieCade East pass holders will have the chance to view the jammers as they work on PlayStation Mobile game development from the Digital Learning Suite as well as attend the Live GameJam Feedback Session on Saturday, the 16th and the Game Jam Screenings from 7 - 7:50 pm on Sunday the 17th.


//Bedroom Developments: Making PlayStation Games in Your Underwear

12 Noon - 1:00 PM
PlayStation Mobile is democratizing the publishing ecosystem on consoles, tablets, and smartphones by allowing independent developers to create and sell their games across an array of certified devices, including the PS Vita handheld console. By eliminating the need for special development hardware and creating a simple portal for publishing, it is now easier for smaller teams to create compelling experiences that reach hardcore console gamers. And although the PlayStation Mobile platform has only recently launched, it is already attracting a diverse crowd of gamemakers, including established independent teams like Vlambeer and up-and-coming talent like NuChallenger. Panelists talk about their personal journeys in independent game development, and their experience with PlayStation Mobile..

Presented by Rami Ismail, Shawn Alexander Allen, and Manuel Marcano
Rami Ismail is the business & development guy at Vlambeer, the award-winning Dutch independent studio best known for Super Crate Box, GUN GODZ, Ridiculous Fishing, LUFTRAUSERS, Yeti Hunter and many more games. Rami also created presskit(), a tool that allows indie developers around the world to reach out to press and market their games. Rami exclusively drinks cane sugar coke.

Shawn Alexander Allen's late dad was a black New York based rocker who dressed as and went by the pseudonym “Dracula”. Shawn was raised by his white English major mom from Farmville, NC who moved to New York and became a gardener/environmental activist/poet/taxi driver/repo person/mother. Somehow this union created a child obsessed with digital games from the time he was a baby who is now creating games under his company, NuChallenger. Shawn’s aim is to make games based around interesting combat interactions that are steeped in dark and humorous takes on themes that are politically and ideologically driven such as gentrification, the war on terror, and humanity’s inevitable self-destruction. Games that reflect these themes are the future Playstation Mobile game, Treachery in Beatdown City, and "the universe within..." a game that Shawn was a designer and artist on working with 4 talented individuals for the 48 hour Global Game Jam 2012. The game won “Best Overall” at the NYU Game Center.

Manuel “Manny” “Were Jesus” Marcano wants to create the greatest RPGs on the face of the planet. Having learned to read as a young child from playing Dragon Warrior, Manny feels a kinship with the genre at a very deep level. Living in New York, he has worked on games such as The Darkness, Bioshock and Max Payne 3. Manny is the coding brain and a co-conspirator behind the future Playstation Mobile game Treachery in Beatdown City and a secret project code named “Conqueror.


//GameDesign Workshop: GameU

1:00 - 3:00 PM
The Game Design Workshop is an hour and half session where students will learn the fundamentals of game design by creating small, tabletop games. After a brief introduction to the common characteristics of games, students will form into groups and rapidly prototype a game. At the end there will be testing and feedback of the work.

Presented by Charles Pratt
Charles J. Pratt is a freelance game designer and researcher at NYU's Game Center, where he teaches game studies and game design. In his freelance career he has worked on games for a variety of platforms, from street games to browser games to Kinect games. He interviews other game designers on their craft at Another Castle.


//Renga Screening

3:00 - 4:00 PM
A unique opportunity to play Renga. Renga is about finding a way home. Attacked and left for dead, our hero must carefully marshal their resources to build a new ship, confront their nemesis and finally return home. Only this hero isn't visible on the screen - it's the entire audience, working collectively to control the action using laser pointers directed at the screen. Turning the traditional hero's journey on its head, Renga asks the question - what if the ultimate reward can only be grasped by many hands? The show combines real-time crowd interaction technology, retro videogame aesthetics and a wry sense of humour to bring the audience together and leave them feeling a deep sense of camaraderie. Renga was awarded with the 2012 IndieCade Game Developer Choice Award.

Presented by WallFour, UK



//Well Played, Session 3

3:00 - 3:30 PM
What makes a game good? or bad? or better? Building on the ETC Press books and journal and the success of last year's sessions, Nick Fortugno will play Cart Life. Cart Life is a retail simulation for windows. This game combines common videogame devices with a mundane setting to examine the life of a street vendor. Cart Life plays with game literacy and expectations to help truly simulate its experience of modern capitalism. Well Played Sessions hosted by Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center.

Presented by Nick Fortugno
Nick Fortugno is a game designer and entrepreneur of digital and real-world games based in New York City, and a founder of Playmatics, a game development company. Playmatics has created a variety of games including the CableFAX award winning Breaking Bad: The Interrogation, the Corporation of Public Broadcasting educational game HD LAB, and the upcoming iOS games Untouchables: The Mean Streets of Chicago and Shadow Government.


//Well Played, Session 4 (Unmanned)

3:30 - 4:00 PM
What makes a game good? or bad? or better? Building on the ETC Press books and journal and the success of last year's sessions, Naomi Clark will play and discuss Unmanned. Unmanned is an experimental game about a day in the life of a drone pilot. Description from Art Technica: "The game uses a series of short, split-screen vignettes to combine simple mini-games with clickable conversation options, and takes you through the rather safe, humdrum existence of a modern drone pilot. Shaving, driving to work, flirting with your cute co-pilot, and even playing video games with your son are all given equal weight to actually blowing up a suspected insurgent thousands of miles away from a comfortable seat in front of a monitor. The game's short length practically demands multiple playthroughs, with different conversation options leading to significantly different outcomes. The result is a nuanced, wide-ranging look at a soldier's life from a variety of viewpoints."select a game from the festival finalists and play it live to help analyze the experience and open up a discussion with the game designers. The goal is to help develop and define a literacy of games as well as a sense of their value as an experience.

Presented by Naomi Clark
Naomi Clark is a freelance game designer based in New York City who's been making games since the early 90s. She's worked with Gamelab, LEGO, Fresh Planet, and many other brands and companies, producing, designing and writing for games ranging from browser-based MMOs to casual downloadable titles, social and mobile games, and games for new handheld platforms. She's currently working on a new independent project with the Brooklyn Game Ensemble.


//The New York Scene

4:00 - 5:00 PM
New York's indepedent video game development scene is strong and thriving, in fact, there is so much going on that it's hard to know about everything! Asi Burak, Joshua DeBonis, and Colin Snyder discuss the new york games community and the parts that make it up, from Babycastles to Games for Change to street games, and everything in between. Moderated by IndieCade's own Celia Pearce..

Asi Burak, Joshua De Bonis, and Colin Snyder. Moderated by Celia Pearce
Joshua DeBonis designs digital, real-world, and board games. He is the Director of Sortasoft LLC, an indie game studio in Brooklyn NY, where he lives with his wife Amanda. Josh is also co-founder of NYC-Playtest and Brooklyn Game Ensemble. Josh is particularly interested in exploring ways to integrate history with games, procedural generation of game content, and in creating games that provide a deep and meaningful experience in a short play time. He is currently developing Meriwether, an RPG about the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and Killer Queen Arcade, a 12-player RTS platformer arcade cabinet.

Asi Burak is Co-President of Games for Change. In his role there, he leads on the development of programs to raise the quality and reach of social impact games, and co-produces the Annual Games for Change Festival, the largest gaming event in New York. For partners including USAID, The World Bank, American Museum of Natural History, and Pulitzer Prize-winning NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof (“Half the Sky”), he is guiding the investment of $8 million into new game projects.
 For his work at G4C, Burak was named one of the “Digital 25: Leaders in Emerging Entertainment” by the Producers Guild of America (PGA) and Variety Magazine. Before Games for Change, Burak co-founded and led Impact Games, the creators of the acclaimed “PeaceMaker” and “Play the News” gaming platforms (acquired 2010). He is often interviewed by international media, and has been invited to speak at conferences and institutions including TEDxGotham, Harvard Kennedy School, Sundance, Skoll Forum, SXSW, and the US Army War College. He is a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts’ MFA in Design for Social Innovation, and holds a Master of Entertainment Technology from Carnegie Mellon University.

Colin Snyder is a videogame developer, graphic designer, and writer based in New York City. After working in both the production and art departments at Rockstar Games, he joined Babycastles in 2011 as their resident graphic designer and has acted as a producer and director on projects including numerous Babycastles events, the voiceover sessions for Ivan Safrin's Space Cruiser, and the What's in a Game? film project. He created Gameifesto, a forthcoming matchmaking social network for aspiring game developers to meet, congregate and collaborate on videogame projects. He also writes for Vice Magazine's Motherboard, about videogames, game design, industry history, and gaming culture.

Celia Pearce is a veteran game designer, author, researcher, teacher, curator and artist, specializing in multiplayer gaming and virtual worlds, independent, art, and alternative game genres, as well as games and gender. She is currently Associate Professor of Digital Media at Georgia Tech, where she also directs the Experimental Game Lab and the Emergent Game Group. Her game designs include the award-winning virtual reality attraction Virtual Adventures (for Iwerks and Evans & Sutherland) and the Purple Moon Friendship Adventure Cards for Girls. She has also consulted for clients such as Sony and Walt Disney Imagineering. Her writings include numerous papers on game design and art games, as well as Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds (MIT 2009). She is also a co-founder and Festival Chair for IndieCade.


//You Don't Seem Happy! Video Games and the Philosophical Problem of Being a Sore Loser

4:00 - 5:00 PM
We often say that video games are "fun", but in this lively talk I will explain why this is almost entirely mistaken. When we play video games, our expressions are rarely those of happiness or bliss. Instead, we frown, grin, and shout in frustration. So why do we even do it? Why do we play video games even though they make us unhappy? With game examples from QWOP to Super Hexagon to Red Dead Redemption, Jesper Juul will compare the experience of being a sore loser to the experience of reading tragic plays and the shock of watching horror movies.

Presented by Jesper Juul
Jesper Juul is an assistant professor at the New York University Game Center. He has been working with the development of video game theory since the late 1990's. His publications include Half-Real on video game theory, and A Casual Revolution on how puzzle games, music games, and the Nintendo Wii brought video games to a new audience. He maintains the blog The Ludologist on "game research and other important things". His upcoming book The Art of Failure will be published in February 2013.


//John Sharp Keynote: Spacewar!, Punk Rock and the Indie Dev Scene: A Semi-Secret Quasi-History of Our DIY Roots

5:00 - 6:00 PM
Back in 1961, The Hingham Institute Study Group on Space Warfare kick-started videogames out of the nascent hacker community bubbling up at MIT. Jump forward about 15 years, and DIY crawled out of the punk rock scene. Though it isn’t completely obvious, indie devs are carrying on some of the good (and bad) stuff that led to and sustained Spacewar! and punk rock. Things like building a new kind of experience where there wasn’t anything before; bringing a hacker’s mindset to an industry; and creating a new way to think about making things outside monolithic capitalism – that sort of thing. John Sharp will put on his ex-punk rock art historian indie dev hat and connect these dots (and others) between the first game, the birth of DIY and the indie game scene.

Presented by John Sharp
John Sharp is a designer, art historian and educator. He has been involved in the creation and study of art and design for over twenty years. John is a member of the game design collective Local No. 12, which focuses on games as a research platform. He is the Associate Professor of Games and Learning in the School of Art, Media and Technology at Parsons The New School for Design where he co-directs PETLab (Prototyping, Evaluation and Technology Lab). Additionally, John is a partner in Supercosm, where he focuses on interaction and game design for arts and education clients.


// Developing Physical Games: Tools and Tricks for Jumping Off-Screen and into the Wide World

6:00 - 7:00 PM
Major game consoles now have movement sensors, as do most smart phones, and cameras capable of motion detection are everywhere in our daily lives. Taking full advantage of this radical change in input possibilities requires an equally radical shift in game design. Thinking radically is what indies do best, and this panel will show and discuss examples of playful movement-based experiences on a range of platforms.

Featuring Panelists Kaho Abe, Katherine Isbister, and Greg Trefry. Moderated by Yannick LeJacq
Kaho Abe is currently the Artist in Residence at the Game Innovation Lab at NYU-Poly and a Computational Fashion Fellow at Eyebeam Art & Technology Center, for designing and building digital games that are played in the physical world, face to face. Kaho's work is largely focused on improving social and personal experiences through the use of technology, fashion and games. Kaho teaches classes and workshops on designing and building alternative physical game controllers, and co-hosts a monthly playtesting event with Come Out and Play at Eyebeam Art & Technology Center. She holds a MFA in Design & Technology from Parsons the New School for Design.

Katherine Isbister is Associate Professor jointly appointed between Computer Science and Engineering at NYU-Poly, and the NYU Game Center. Isbister is Research Director of the Game Innovation Lab at NYU-Poly, where her work focuses on broadening the social and emotional palette of interaction with technology. Her team builds research games which explore this terrain, with support from Microsoft, Yahoo, Bell Labs, and the National Science Foundation. Isbister's book Game Usability was the first to provide broad methodological guidelines to game developers for conducting player research.

Greg Trefry has wide array of experience designing games—everything from web-based MMOs to hit casual games to alternate reality games. He co-founded the game design studio Gigantic Mechanic to explore the bounds of game design through mobile games that interact with the real-world. He serves as director of the Come Out & Play Festival, a festival of street games in New York City. Greg teaches at New York University and recently wrote the book, Casual Game Design: Designing Play for the Gamer in All of Us.

Yannick LeJacq is a technology reporter for the International Business Times and a video game critic for Kill Screen and The Wall Street Journal. His work has been featured in Salon, The Atlantic, and The Huffington Post when he can steal a moment away from the business world to obsess over things like U.S. politics and LGBT issues, and he has spoken on panels at Gotham Media Ventures and this year’s CES. When he’s not ruminating about the latest dancing cat GIFs or technological advances in the realm of cyberdildonics, he can occasionally be found tinkering with old-fashioned analogue systems like books and film cameras.


//Revealing the GameJam Games

7:00 - 8:00 PM
Participating in a GameJam is its own reward, but that didn’t stop us from adding a few prizes of our own! Join our GameJammers as they present the 48-hour games they’ve developed over the course of IndieCade East for Sony Playstation Mobile. Then our judges will reveal which games have been chosen as award winners, including the grand prize of a Sony publishing deal and participation in Sony’s press conference at the Game Developers Conference!

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