Bloom - The Game

About Bloom - The Game

Commissioned by the Greater London Authority as part of Wonder series that are celebrating Olympics and Paralympics games, ‘Bloom’ is and interactive architectural installation designed and developed by Alisa Andrasek and Jose Sanchez from The Bartlett School of Architecture at UCL, London. The project proposes a crowd-sourced approach for assembly by using game mechanics as part of the design of one unit. This unit (The ‘Bloom Cell’) would be produced in an Array of 60.000 identical copies where proposed for manufacturing allowing and expecting the public to Play and assemble diverse formations.


Trailer

Screenshots


About Bloom Games

JOSE SANCHEZ is an Architect / Programmer / Game Designer based in Los Angeles, California. He is partner at Bloom Games, start-up built upon the BLOOM project, winner of the WONDER SERIES hosted by the City of London for the London 2012 Olympics. He is the director of the Plethora Project (www.plethora-project.com), a research and learning project investing in the future of on-line open-source knowledge. The project has over 180 videos and an open-source library of code since 2011. Today, he is an Assistant Professor at USC School of Architecture in Los Angeles. His research ‘Gamescapes’, explores generative interfaces in the form of video games, speculating in modes of intelligence augmentation, combinatorics and open systems as a design medium.

ALISA ANDRASEK
is an architect and curator. She is a founding principal of Biothing (biothing.org) operating at the intersection of design, complexity and computer science. Andrasek teaches at The UCL Bartlett School of Architecture and has taught at the AA, Columbia, Pratt, UPenn and RMIT Melbourne. She received numerous awards and her work has been exhibited worldwide.

Developer's Artistic Statement

The project was conceptualized as an act of ‘collective gardening’, where new formations could constantly emerge or disappear depending on the interaction with the crowd. The project was also intended as an educational installation; the public would learn about patterns and structure by figuring out what structures could stand and how to achieve specific sequences. Collective interaction was expected from the number of units that would be available to the public at every time. The units were proposed to become a token of participation, allowing the public to take them home as a souvenir, adding to concepts of dissipation and entropy of the piece.

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