Festival Dates:
October 6 - 8, 2017
Downtown Los Angeles

Clapper

About Clapper

Clapper is a 2 player cooperative rhythm and clap game. The game is most easily visualized as a mix between digital rhythm games and traditional hand clapping games played on schoolyards around the world. Clapper has a unique input method that make use of the camera to distinguish between 5 different types of claps. For instance Clapper can distinguish between straight or diagonal claps, or claps being performed with both hands at the same time. With 4 different difficulties Clapper suits the whole family and is currently available for the iPad.


Trailer

Screenshots


About Bridgeside Interactive

Lee Kåberg - Producer
Daniel Polgar - Lead Design
Daniel Kvarfordt - Lead Code
Marcus Brännfors - Sound & Music

Daniel Hansen - Freelance, Art Director
Ylva Ljunquist – Freelance, Technical Artist
Hanna Eriksson – Freelance, Technical Artist

Developer's Artistic Statement

We wanted to develop a rhythm game (RG) that was as inclusive as possible. The idea came from how certain RGs could be perceived as harsh to new players, booing them and kicking them out of a song, making them feel like they were bad at rhythm and giving them an unpleasant experience with RGs. For us this connects to when we were kids learning about music, and how conventional music education sometimes can make children feel as if they are bad at music, and how this feeling can stay with them their whole lives.

We also felt that the multiplayer aspect of some RGs were lacking. Certain games claimed that playing the game felt like “playing in a real band”, but growing up playing in bands we couldn’t get the same feeling when playing rhythm games. To us, playing multiplayer RGs at most felt like we were playing at the same time, but it never feel like we were playing together. We also wanted to develop a RG that wasn't a lesser imitation of a musical activity, but instead truly was that activity. We didn´t want our input method to feel like a plastic imitation of a real instrument. Claps made sense since they are easy to perform, tactile and acoustic as well as social.

We also felt that many games didn’t use many of the properties that was unique for the pad platform. We wanted to take advantage of the technology and the mobility that the pad format provides. We also wanted to encourage cross generation play. We want kids and parents to play more digital games together in the same natural way as when they play board games. Playing a game on the pad doesn't have to be a solitary experience in the way it often is.

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