Festival Dates:
October 6 - 8, 2017
Downtown Los Angeles

Narcosis

About Narcosis

Survival, horror, beneath the sea.

Stranded on the seafloor with low light and few tools, an industrial diver takes desperate steps to surface before his oxygen — and sanity — give out.

The debut effort of Franco-Californian collective Honor Code, Narcosis ships for PC, Mac and Oculus Rift late Spring, with additional platforms to follow in 2016.


Trailer

Screenshots


About Honor Code, Inc.

Quentin De Beukelaer (Direction)
Damien Dreveau (Design)
Benjamin Perrot (Art)
Adrian Benyamina (Audio)
Emerick Aussignac and Robin Picou (Engineering)
David Chen (Narrative)
Edwin Maynard (QA)
Hanna Woo (Communications).

Developer's Artistic Statement

While the game is most easily described as a “horror game,” we are determined to avoid many of the traditional genre tropes. This is a game about mortality, not morality — beneath the sea, the concept of good and evil does not exist. So while there are aggressive creatures to evade or fight off, these are — like the player character — simply trying to survive. Similarly, while the game features some bizarre sights, sounds, and situations, these are taking place within the protagonist’s mind – there are no zombies, viral outbreaks nor other supernatural/sci-fi elements.

Similarly, we are proud of having attempted to hew as close to reality as possible. Although the premise of the game — an energy mining operation at the bottom of the sea — is futurisitic, it’s neither implausible or too far-flung. We have worked closely with a nautical expert to create as plausible a scenario as possible (while still being interactive and entertaining), and even the resource being mined (Methane Hydrate) is an actual, highly-coveted potential “super fuel.”

During Narcosis student project phase, the then-recent release of Bioshock was still making waves with both game makers and players, and piqued the team’s interest in staging the game in a largely untapped setting: the deep sea. Dear Esther demonstrated a growing appetite for more unconventional narrative fare, and Gone Home’s critical and commercial success reiterated our conviciton in more mature, sophisticated storytelling.

With regards to narrative, the game is inspired by such gripping, extraordinary — and non-fictional — accounts of human endurance in face of overwhelming odds, such as the books (and films) Between a Rock and Hard Place (127 Hours), Into Thin Air and Touching the Void.

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